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Pat Garrett & Billy the Kid: The Film vs. The Historical Events (Read 19776 times)
Stanton
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Re: Pat Garrett & Billy the Kid: The Film vs. The Historical Events
Reply #24 - 10/28/15 at 5:02pm
 
mike bishop wrote on 10/25/15 at 8:54pm:
Stanton, you forget that once the film left the care of the director & his team it was on its own. The studios didn't care much, the cinema's even less. There's a reason why Kubrick observed his releases that close! He knew the situation, as it was common. I grew up in times that equalled the 50s & 60s. It happened quite often the screenings were messy - lights on, wrong format, mixed reels, curtain not opened wide enough, out of focus etc. etc.  I was always the first guy to complain, knowing that sometimes nobody realizes what's wrong and then you'd have to live with it for half an hour or even the whole show.
But coming back to your question, in fact very often the right format was written on the boxes or included paperwork. But regarding widescreen it didn't make a big difference since most cinemas did not have 1,66 AND 1,85 but either one. We only had 1,66 until 1982 as I recall. Which sometimes presented a problem when screening masked 1:1,85 prints like ALL THE PRESIDENTS MEN or IL GRANDE SILENZIO. On the other hand poor Americans obviously had to see everything in 1:1,85 although many widescreen films had been composed for 1:1,66 (foreign DP's and also looking through the old 4:3 viewfinders one rather went for a less drastic composition than 1:1,85. In Locarno they screened CABLE HOGUE 1:1,33 ! Since it is open (4:3 camera negative) they probably didn't dare to screen it 1:1,85. But 1:1,33 is even worse. I once saw SEARCHES open matte, 1:1,33. At first I liked it because I saw so much information I never saw before. But the vista just isn't right. No cinematic feeling. It IS a difficult subject. I projected many of my 35mm prints at our cinema for years and had to live with chopped heads since by that time projector's weren't equipped with 1:1,66 anymore.


I know, and I have already seen wrongly masked films in theatres.

But here we talk about a restoration of a well known film, and there shouldn't be the slightest question which has to be the correct aspect ratio for such a famous film.


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Novecento
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Re: Pat Garrett & Billy the Kid: The Film vs. The Historical Events
Reply #25 - 10/28/15 at 10:53pm
 
So 1.85:1 then?
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mike bishop
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Re: Pat Garrett & Billy the Kid: The Film vs. The Historical Events
Reply #26 - 10/29/15 at 4:03pm
 
Which famous film? I lost track.

But here we talk about a restoration of a well known film, and there shouldn't be the slightest question which has to be the correct aspect ratio for such a famous film.

You'd have to ask the film makers.
And sometimes even they didn't know. Because it wasn't in their hands in the end. I spoke about this subject to cinematographers in the 80s / 90s and later on. Men who worked in the 60s, 70s... They all confirmed my thoughts. These discussions here & today lack knowledge of how it was shooting widescreen. With the exception of Kubrick and various others exact compositions just were not the thing of the day. The most important thing was to leave enough space at the top (chopped heads) and to avoid mics in the frame! The films had tool OK in 66 & 85. That's all. And some films obviously were composed for 66 (although US films!) while others don't suffer much when cropped to 85. And today? We have 1:1,79! (Homevideo) Which is neither Smiley.
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